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-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
of california is adjourned. [applause] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. tweet us, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books on c-span2. >> the same course we have been on will not lead to a better destination. the same path we're on means $20 trillion of debt. means tripling unemployment stagnant take home pay. depressed home values, devastated military, and unless we change course we may be looking at another recession. so, the question of this election comes down to this. do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> we know what change looks like, and what governor romney: is selling ain't it. giving more power the biggest banks isn't change. another $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy is not change. refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies until after the election, definitely not change. >> changing the facts when they're inconvenient to your campaign, not change. >> tuesday night, watch live election coverage on c-span2 with president obama from chicago, and mitt romney in boston, plus key
won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
generations. as governor he compete with other states for jobs and subsidies are relatively easy. california -- [laughter] anybody from california? california, illinois, connecticut, thank you. but those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulations and so that's, you know, we are competing. but we do every day is to try and find companies out there that can't compete. i think about simply if you're a business come to think of yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name the time did the research yourself, i think i'll pay more for the project because i know that company is headquartered in a high tax state. or gosh, i know they have more regulations saw pay more for the product because i know cost the company more for more regulations or takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. so if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulation and faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude to our businesses will outcompete everybody and will get more jobs and that's what we're doing every day. in contrast, my biggest competitor is texas. texas has been doing the
was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question right now. -- go ahead, really quickly -- okay. >> i have campaigned all over the state. some people ha
won this election by a 50-48% margin. debts may go up to around it 50-48 when the folks in california command and last time it took five weeks to count their votes. they count them in five hours in brazil so i'm not sure why california's less technologically advanced but there we are. all these figures are incomplete as they replied -- it appears obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage and out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislativel
's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow this to happen, president obama is going to put you in jail because of political dissent. there are people on my side who are afraid of law of war detention being in barack obama's hand because they think -- they hate him
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
-- [laughter] california -- anybody from california? illinois, connecticut -- thank goodness. [laughter] what those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulation, and so that's -- that's our, you know, we're competing and so what we do every day is find companies out there who can't compete. i think about it as this. if you're in business or think about yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name a time you said to yourself, you know, i'll pay more for that product because they are headquartered in the high tax state. [laughter] oh, gosh, they have more regulations, i'll pay more for that because it costs the company more because they have regulations or it takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulations, faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude, our businesses will out compete everybody. we'll get more competitive every day. our biggest competitor is texas. texas is doing the right thing. look at the last of the eight years, texas is the number one place to do business. when i first got legislated, i --
, um, in california we haven't adopted charter schools and vouchers and choice as much as you have experienced in washington d.c. my belief is that when we introduce choice, um, the public schools will rise, the bar will rise for the public schools because then they have to keep up with the charter schools and the voucher schools that parents elect to go to. is that a belief that you experienced in washington, d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% that you mentioned earlier came into place? >> yeah, it absolutely makes a difference. i don't think that you can have reform in education without choice, and frankly, without choice there won't be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. i mean, look, it's easy for people to fall into the category of, you know, you're bashing teachers. they say if you want change, you push the change, you're not supporting public schools. i support public schools. when i was in office, i gave the teachers the largest raise they ever got. i gave the schools more money than they asked for, and over the period of
california, you're on with author kenneth davis. >> caller: good morning, mr. davis. mr. davis, you mentioned columbus discovering the new world, but i read that the vikings were it the first on the east coast. and before them came a navigator from ireland. do you have any historical the information on these two? >> guest: short. i address both of those questions in don't know much about geography. one is much more easily incident the other because certainly the vikings were here, when i say here, in north america close of 500 years before columbus arrived. the site of the viking village that they left behind has been excavated. it is now a unesco world heritage site up in newfoundland so that evidence is quite clear and overwhelming. the part of the story that connects to columbus, however, was always the idea that, perhaps, there was some way that columbus knew about the vikings having sailed here. there was even a map that later proved to be a fraud that was said to be something columbus had. there is no evidence to suggest that columbus knew about the vikings or their route to north ameri
proud that in california, our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators, senator feinstein and senator boxer. so women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our number are great, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator baldwin -- [applause] >> we are very proud of that. senator-elect -- [applause] only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. so that's pretty exciting. and, unfortunately, we won't have capital coal -- kathy local and betty sutton in this next congress, but the future is soon and coming upon us and we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. in the past week since the election were still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success or as i said yesterday, and as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states, of the house democratic women? because this is where hopes and dreams of america's families are rising. they may not know that. th
was at active in the civil rights movement in the 60s and in the 70s he was in northwest california where he and his wife raised their two sons neck and neil. he taught at a conference of one high school among the redwoods. and he began writing about contemporary issues. he is a prolific writer. his latest book is "mr. president: how and why the founders created a chief executive." it is my pleasure to welcome back to the david library, ray raphael. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be at the david library with a full and eager crowd. this history is important. we will be talking not about ancient history by contemporary history. the history of the founding and let me start by noting that americans engage every four years into very unique principles. one in october and we are about to start six days from now. about half the nation firmly determined that their side loses nomination goes to ruins. they figure out which of the two contestants they prefer. that is one of our rituals. it is highly partisan. the other ritual that we will also talk about his every four years in october, americans u
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
's called california. it's called maryland coming and i don't see any reason why we don't wait two years to see whether how california is doing with their new higher marginal tax rates on folks and sales taxes on middle-income people as well and sales taxes and maryland raising the tax on guys that made a million come to madrid 50, and they are down to under 50 tax in maryland because they can't leave. they make a million dollars and they can walk across the border. so, we are seeing some very -- people are testing obama's peery in the state and i think we should do it on a small state like vermont at first and see how it works. whereas texas and florida are giving an idea of how you can govern without an income tax. people moved. we kind of know what is going to happen here. indiana, illinois, big border. they just past the right to work and they're giving the school kids a choice of a falter scholarship. illinois raised taxes want to inform the government worker pension system. who is going to build a factory in the 100 miles on the western side of the border? any takers for the people
south and west as california. those screws that can get in relatively fast have driven in. we still have equipment in teams on the west coast that the concern was still three to five days transit time to get them to the east coast. there's also concern that if they couldn't get back to their fire season when think it's going they would send the resources. so the president directed that we bring to bear dat resources aircraft. so there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response, but also understand that teams for our do nothing well before sandi hit. additional teams called from the midwest and the south, where it makes sense they can drive and faster. whether it makes sense to fly teams in come of the crew starts flying this afternoon. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> next question from an adrenaline. >> hi, i'm wondering how the contracting process is going. i know some contracts are rhodium placed. this request for proposals for other types of aid. and also, this fema have enough money with a 3.6 billion, especially when the
is this. not the hardware, but the software, the retail, the google. last book i was in california's silicon valley, working and talking to tech companies. we need to start k through 12 and we need to revamp maine's economy. we have a small economic engine, huge infrastructure. we can compete but we need to be closer to this, and while shoes were great for the economy and maine has great shoe companies, we need to be closer to this for the future. >> moderator: thank you. danny dalton. dalton: our educational problem has been advanced since i was this tall. we have the same problems in education, tax reform can health care, everything is the same. nothing's changed. this whole idea that our congress, all of a sudden can't get along and address these problems is fiction, because what's been going on is that implicitly our represent-to-two parties have basically a monopoly over the country that are controlled by lobbiests. aren't addressing these problems, it's been decades and same problem. higher education is a joke because it's a big business. we have an implied guarantee by the
organizations. it also features the involvement of the university of california, just working with local communities to rethink and refrain perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security personnel and he would security. there are a lot of, you know, bottom-up approach is to changing the securities sector. we see some of these efforts, important efforts happening in addition to the high-level policy stuff that we have been discussing, such as the police for each ship initiative. >> thank you. i don't know. okay. let's take this as our final question. i have one more very last question to pose to our panel before we break. >> i am independent researcher and consultant. so my question is the same primarily of bob. you know, of course mentioning his paper and highlighted the problems of the challenges. the light footprint, not come so or afghanistan. thousands, if not tens of hundreds of thousands of people on the ground appeal to push the democratization and the ss are forward. so i guess my question, what our considerations are when we engage. what can we do during the conflict to
from california, for five minutes to thank you, very much, mr. chairman. i want to thank you for holding this hearing and working with the democrats to make this a bipartisan hearing. we are talking about this ongoing health tragedy. an untold number of vials of steroids were contaminated. they have sold all -- they have so far killed 32 people. it has brought unspeakable devastation to so many families. that is why i am grateful for it joyce lovelace to be here. it takes a great deal of courage to come forward. let's not lose sight of the wrongdoer. the regulators deserve blame. the primary blame is the company. we have theubpoena, the former president necc, barry cadden, we asked him to testify about how this company handled the matter. what we learned is that even 10 years ago, people who were regulating the company indicated that they had sloppy practices. in many years ago they indicated that they could have can have a meningitis outbreak. it wasn't corrected by the company. and the company went about its ways, telling people that they were going to behave better. they
where stanford california is and i went to berkeley to get away from stanford. i study political theory and then i was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant why was a student, robert, who at that time, he brought in and worked there for a while. i guess the rest is in history but anyway, that's a bit of early backer spent and i want to get in this comment from jill. jill tweets in, what influence do you think mr. hitchens writing had on shaping women's history in america and the world? >> i'm not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously a bloke i have a new. he was absolutely, he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote a piece for "vanity fair," why women aren't funny. at it was one more assignment and he wrote it. and if you actually read it, it doesn't actually, the article doesn't say what the title might imply. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man, and so loved by women. he was very charismatic. women adored him, but he didn't let the sexual card at all. so i don't know what, i don't know if he has a place in quote women's hi
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
house seats, half their games have to do with, come from illinois and california in a largely redistricting game or so you democrats made small gains in house by the republicans still control the house. what would you say was the democrats message this election cycle, in terms of issues or policy? they talk about republican extremism, but wasn't there messaging two-pronged message of the congressional message? it also reflected in the presidential, but wasn't there messaging two-pronged? one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget or that was basically the democrats message. the republicans are for millionaires. look out the ryan budget. they want tax cuts for millionaires and they want to cut programs for the middle-class. and medicare is one of the examples, and the ryan budget showed different priorities and the republican priorities are wrong. that message did not really work. it was not a decisive win, sorting out the house level, for that message. and think of this to my editor, i've got to credit my editor at roll call who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last
, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort of in the middle, 48, 49% job approval rating for much of this year, and about 1.5% growth, we a
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
a senator in ohio. >> host: new york is the biggest state. >> guest: like california today. seward is the founding father of the republican party. this is only the second presidential election the republican party participated in. seward is the dominant figure in the republican party. it's sort of his -- he is more significant than any two other figures in the party combined. chase, another alternative, is the man chiefly responsible for the republican party's power in ohio and, in fact, much of the midwest -- >> host: also a big state. >> guest: even in those days as it is today, and, still, perhaps america's one -- one of america's most famous anti-slavery advocates, a radical abolitionist. he didn't start that way, but at this point he was. seward, not radical on anti-slavery issues was perceived that way because of a series of speeches he gave viewed as inflammatory. lincoln, on the other hand, because he did not have a national record, could convincingly portray himself as the least radical. in those days, the least anti-slavery republican, up for the race. they go it, and sew
to a country like indonesia, you know, this is a country that you put on a map, it goes from california to bermuda. it is huge. enormous population. and to reduce indonesia only to a bit player and be a role issue on the global war on terrorism department sit too well in indonesia. so i think part of the challenge was to really work with these countries in of themselves and not just as instrument of something that was going on in another part of the world. i came to the job by being ambassador in korea, and i walked in to a meeting that i thought was going to be with steve hadly and condoleezza rise joined the meeting. both steve and condoleezza said to me our country has been going through two wars and we need diplomats. they made it clear we need to start tamping down some issues in the world. we can't have everything kind of belowing up in the our faces. and one of the issues that i was very aware of coming from seoul was that if you did opinion survey in the fall of 2004, some 40% of south korea begans were blaming the united states for the north korea nuclear crisis, if you could i
into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. again, we have to look at money in politics. as i say what was then and in effect of a change of opinion. >> this is very interesting. comments from offers speakers that i want to ask at a demographic group none of you touched on this site because distant name i heard of demography being impactful in america. one out of every five americans has a disability and 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. yet, at the national press club when there was an opportunity or, as you know, the past president of the press club for the romney campaign and the obama can antisense him to some to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign showed not to attend or issue a position paper on disabilities. so i wanted to ask, why given that one out of every five americans has the disability, 51% of american voters has a family or with a disability. why isn't there more of a conversation about that demographic withi
features the involvement of the professor from the university of california. working with local communities to rethink and refrain the perception and understanding of, you know, neighborhood security and human security so there are a lot of bottom-up approaches to changing the perception and changing the securities sector and you see some of these efforts happening in addition to the high level policies of that we have been discussing such as the police for egypt. >> thank you, hesham. i don't know if you have anything. okay let's take this final question and then i have one more very last question to pose to the panel before we close. >> good morning. my name is jason come independent researcher and consultant on issues mainly around policing conflict. so, my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will we get a little bit four tunisia. you know, he mentioned his paper and highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya and with a light footprint. not a kosovo or afghanistan or the iraq model where we have thousands of content and hundreds of thousands of people on the ground to be a
in a highly competitive and highly mobile labor pool, alabama and california and texas and vermont have some sense that their kids have a common basis of knowledge. so since they came up with the national governors association, i would hope that we could have more discussion. >> i agree. michael gold is really doing a lot of work in the united kingdom. he got all excited. in the k-12 system, it goes to the heart of it. there is this deep belief that we need to develop acute self-esteem so we can perform. we need to do is tell people we need to do that to have self-esteem. because we get that right, that will be great. they are not easy to achieve, but if i could wave a wand i would make k-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession that we all aspire to, they would be places like japan where they call their teachers sensei and you can feel the difference between we view those in america and those in other countries. we have decided to unionize rather than professionalize. when you do that, but you end up with is creating this in k-12. a lot of people disagree. i think that cho
and california. they make the decisions. the politics you see on the media which they own and manipulate and make believe the two parties which are really one party, the donkeys face an elephant face, and i am running to reveal the truth about all of these so we can deal with reality instead of the fake democracy. sanders: it's the economy. we have almost 15% of working people in this country that are either unemployed or underemployed and 50 million people with no health insurance and median family income has gone down by some $4,000 in the last ten years. i am going to work very hard to continue my efforts for the millions of jobs that our country desperately needs by rebuilding our infrastructure and putting a whole lot of people back to work building the roads and the water systems and the bridges. we've got to transform our energy system away from fossil fuel, energy efficiency and sustainable energy when you do that you create a lot of jobs and we need to free think our disastrous trade policies which have led to the outsourcing of millions of jobs and we have to take on wall street and get
pipeline, particularly in various parts of the country, but i look at california where we have such immense success. two women senators. we have a freight -- great female delegation out there but we also have folks who have been there for 20 years. many are elected 20 years ago. how long are they going to stay? are we prepared for that? that is our next piece and we will be. >> great. this was sort of a perception in some parts of the country this was a good year for women because a couple of men said a couple of dumb things. dawn, is that true? was this about a couple of men saying a couple of dumb things? >> they did say dumb things, let's be clear but this year of the woman part because i think that goes to it i pick up on your analogy, this year women went viral. the same way the media landscape is fractured. i think you could say this was the year of the woman candidate part two. this was the year of the younger woman. this is the year of the diverse woman. this is the year of women's uteruses. it was a lot of different levels of women got involved in a way that i think 20 years ago it
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our
and republican legislators. prominent include roy ashburn former california state senator and activist and larry craig former u.s. senator from idaho, and activist and ted haggard evangelical pastor and activists. [applause] we will do a couple more. donald trump. donald trump might be in the book. >> we do have the entry for. [laughter] >> akin asked why we put it in there. >> any individual at a bar, party or other social function as having more fun than you. [laughter] they also include those who are dating attractive women, make more money than you or manage to handle everything life throws at them with composure. they often have great loving families, use proper grammar, and about wines, exercise regularly, make wise financial decisions, donate to charities and read looks. people have their lives together in the onion world are asked holes. >> yes, at best. >> newt gingrich. that guy doesn't exists. lebron james. how about basketball? [laughter] or we can do michael jordan. would you like to hear michael jordan or basketball? let's do michael jordan. reid michael jordan. jordan, michael, ga
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